Broad Bean Dip

10 Jul

One the hardest things about having an allotment is not keeping the weeds and slugs at bay, although that does take up a considerable amount of time, energy and money. Actually one of the hardest things about having a plot for a supermarket shopping ex-city dwelling slacker like myself is actually remembering to harvest the produce once they have grown and doing something with them.

Lettuce, tomatoes and courgettes are something of a no brainer of course although there was a brief period last summer when, even with our one humble courgette plant, we had so many courgettes I did make a cake or two with them. But you find yourself growing things you would never normally buy, in large quantities, and then find yourself having to do all sorts of imaginative things with unusual root veg. Witness my beetroot pancakes, mash and cake last year. Like the allotment itself it’s all very time consuming and it’s no wonder that so much produce ends up whithering on the vine

So now it’s the humble broad beans turn. I planted my broad beans in October last year. As a crop you couldn’t get more low maintenance than broad beans. I literally planted them, ignored them, noticed they were growing. Have weeded them once, have never fed or watered them and at one point rigged up some cane and string to stop them toppling over and that was it.

It was only the other week I realised I would need to stop ignoring them and actually get my act together and harvest them. From then on the low maintenance of their growing has been swiftly replaced by high maintenance food prep. You have to pick them, shell them and then think of what on earth to do with them. I googled easy broad bean dips and found this one from Jamie Oliver http://www.jamieoliver.com/magazine/recipes-view.php?title=broad-bean-dip

It was fairly simple. I assembled the required ingredients, which sat doing nothing for a while until I could face sitting down to shell the broad beans. This may all sound a bit over the top but I have never been the type of person to make home made humus, why bother when you can buy it from a shop for a quid?

But there I was feeling like a nineteen fifties throw back, shelling broad beans like my granny used to. In fairness I did rope the hubby in to help me and we sat after dinner at the weekend shelling beans and supping wine so it wasn’t so arduous.

dip1

Ingredients ready

dip2

Broad beans shelled

dip3

Blending

dip4

The finished product!

The end result was quite tasty and a wee bit satisfying in a I-made-this-from-scratch kind of way. Not sure I will ever make it again though as of course the kids, even though big fans of humus, turned their noses up at this – it is green after all. And the hubby, being Scottish thought it was all a bit too whole-foody for his palate. So the real task has been eating my way through the huge vat of broad bean dip I was left with.

 

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Broad Bean Dip”

  1. lizard100 July 10, 2014 at 4:55 pm #

    Delicious. We intended to do something similar with some of our but succumbed to eating them whole instead.

  2. gillridge July 11, 2014 at 10:35 am #

    I can vouch for the broad bean dip – it was very nice! Leon liked it even if your two didn’t! Great to see the photos of its production! XX

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: