Cosy feet

29 Oct

A storm similar to that of the famous 1987 hurricane was meant to be coming our way this week. Happily it wasn’t as bad as feared and the power cut we endured only lasted 12 hours. Yesterday was spent figuring out where I had left candles and matches and going slightly stir crazy without the magic power of TV and DVDs to help quell the kids’ boredom. So today felt the perfect day for a trip to the plot to stretch legs, get some air and assess any wind related damage.

In some ways I am quite a negative person – I often expect the worst and am frequently pleasantly surprised. I expected to find no shed so when I saw my shed still in tact I was so delighted that my storm damaged bed of brassicas barely registered.

To be fair I am not sure they were ever going to produce anything. I planted them way back in March I think and still not a hint of broccoli could be seen. Is that normal for sprouting broccoli? They looked a bit like mini palm trees by the end – four feet tall, lots of foliage, no broccoli or anything edible, after seven months. Maybe the seeds were duff.

cosy feet storm damage

Windswept brassicas

I uprooted the worst hit plants and propped another one up with a cane – I will give it another month to see if anything might come to fruition. As always I was surprised at the lack of sentiment I felt as I tossed the much nurtured plants into the plot dump. I was already planning what to plant next once they have all finally been cleared. They just feel like they have overstayed their welcome somewhat and have given me nothing in return.

Luckily the edible border, which I have finished for now, is so stumpy it was unaffected by the bluster of the week. I surveyed the rest of the plot and gathered what had been scattered – a plastic chair had gone next door, my wind chime was tangled up in the beetroot patch and my seedling trays were scattered far and wide.

cosy feet edible border

Edible border undamaged

There was also the painstaking task of untangling the netting that had protected the brassicas from hungry birds for the umpteenth time. Once that was done we planted raised bed three – a new edition to the plot, made out of plastic lawn edging that cost two quid, with garlic, onions and broad beans. Apparently the more frost garlic endures the bigger the bulbs.

cosy feet whole plot

Raised bed 3 – a budget bed made of plastic bordering

Once that was done we stopped for hot chocolate and biscuits – the highlight of any trip to the plot  as far as my kids are concerned. I realised as we sat there in the afternoon sun I had not thought of my cold damp feet because for once they were neither cold nor damp. My new boots have finally arrived from a well known outdoor shop and this was their first outing to the plot. I had vowed I would get sensible, sober green wellies that befit my age and status as a keen forty-something allotmenteer. Gone are the days of faddy fashion wellies. But then an email from a well known outdoor shop popped up in my inbox and they had such cute, silly wellies for 15 quid (in the sale, reduced from 25), I could not resist getting more of the same – pink but – for a bit of a twist – with geese on them. I am a such a sucker, but at the moment they are doing the  job.

cosy feet

Behold: my new boots!

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4 Responses to “Cosy feet”

  1. Gill Ridgewell. October 31, 2013 at 10:54 am #

    So glad the plot survived the storm more or less unscathed! I love the photo of the new bed – it’s a great shot of the whole plot as well. Of course I love the boots too which I have been lucky enough to see in real life – they may be pink but they’re sturdy! XX

    • wifi allotment October 31, 2013 at 8:22 pm #

      Thanks – I’m really happy with my budget bed! I can’t believe we have managed two trips to the plot in half term and it’s almost November – the weather has been lovely x

  2. Lindy Joy November 5, 2013 at 11:13 pm #

    Hello fellow woman allotmenteer! Reading your blog was a pleasure and I like your new wellies. They have inspired me as I too need a pair as I have taken on Plot 10, all 10 rods of it! I shall be visiting your site from time to time to see how it’s all going for you and to get some inspiration!

    • wifi allotment November 6, 2013 at 9:14 pm #

      Thanks Lindy, I’ll have a look at your blog too to see what plot 10 looks like! Good luck – the first year is definitely the hardest, although actually we ignored our plot for the first six months so they were quite easy work wise tho rather guilt ridden. I’d definitely say do what you can now on dry sunny days and then when it gets baltic relax till February! Happy digging

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